14 january 14:15–15:00

EVEN THE KNOWN IS KNOWN TO FEW: HUMANITARIAN KNOWLEDGE IN THE DIGITAL AGE

 Studio, Library
Panellists:
Leonid Borodkin, Deputy Dean of the Faculty of History, Head of the Department of Historical Informatics, Lomonosov Moscow State University
Nikolai Grintser, Acting Director, ION RANEPA
Alexey Kasyan, Senior scientist STEPS RANEPA
Fedor Uspensky, Director of the Institute of Russian Language of the Russian Academy of Sciences
With the advent of the industrial and then post-industrial era, humanities knowledge and education are increasingly forced to "prove" their necessity and relevance. One of these challenges was the notorious "information explosion" and the subsequent rapid digitalization of all spheres of human activity. Humanitarians, of course, perceive the "digital" as a new and extremely useful tool for the search and dissemination of knowledge. But could digital technology in principle change the subject and methods of the humanities?


Discussion points:
• The "digital" has made cultural achievements and the results of the work of humanitarians accessible. Will the super-accessibility of knowledge lead to an impressive profusion of new ideas?
• Will global digitalization lead to the disappearance of the boundary between the humanities and the sciences? Will the triumph of data science lead to the dominance of scientific criteria in humanities knowledge?
• Is there a fundamental incompatibility between humanitarian and computational metrics? If notions of justice, truth, and scientific curiosity cannot be quantified and converted into data, will their value diminish in a digital world?
• How do we understand creativity in the context of digitalization and the development of machine learning? What humanities skills will become increasingly valuable in a world where AI becomes an everyday occurrence?
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